Doodle For Your Noodle: Summer 2016

Posted by on Jul 6, 2016 in doodles
Doodle For Your Noodle: Summer 2016

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The art critic edition

We are back with another round of Doodle For Your Noodle! As you may recall, every quarter we place a new paper banner along the table in our Northeast Conference Room where employees can let their creative juices flow. Here at Art Force, we encourage doodling by all. How childish, you may think. Or maybe, how distracting!

Negatory, my friend! Doodling is actually good for you. It’s kind of like brain food, or maybe we could call it a warm-up exercise for the mind. Doodling promotes creative thinking and allows for the brain to make greater connections between abstract thoughts; it helps get all those synapses firing. Doodling is another example of why art is good for the mind, as it improves cognitive ability and concentration.

In this Doodle For Your Noodle, we are taking a slightly different approach by calling upon our inner art critic to give a brief analysis for several of this quarter’s doodles. Although only a few are described here, full list of doodles can be found at the bottom of the post.

Doodle Art

fly

This creature appears to be an interpretation of a lightning bug or firefly. Through its bolt-shaped nose, sharp teeth, and menacing eyes, the insect has a malignant and daunting presence -despite its adorable and abstract circle legs. The cross shape on its back could have several meanings: it may be a plus sign and indicate a positive battery charge, or it could be a symbol of medical care, or it may simply be a design done for aesthetic purposes.

baby walrus

With a body formed from simple, yet bosomy, lines, a single dot for each eye, and two U-shaped teeth, this walrus is a pleasant, non-threatening character. Through the word bubble, the character says what appears to be his name, bby walrus. Clearly happy and easy-going, the walrus exudes the yolo swag to which the artist ascribes it.

bull

The bull character exhibits a more realistic animal depiction, within the realm of doodles, as its has a recognition of spatial depth and attempts at a three-dimensional existence. Its hind legs appear further back in space than its front legs, and its horns protrude into space -almost as if they may pierce the viewer. The expression of the bull remains ambiguous. Does its full bearing of teeth indicate aggression? Or does it lend towards happiness, as its tail wags in the background?

business kitty

This anthropomorphic figure depicts an upright cat wearing a shirt and tie while holding a briefcase. The working kitty exhibits a face of confusion through its opened-mouthed frown and upward gazing eyes. The expression is appropriate as the melange of identities – business person and kitty cat – would likely cause perplexity or even an identity crisis. Furthering the bafflement is the artist’s statement “All Business.” By limiting the feline anthropoid to a single label of businessperson – definitely stated through the punctuation – the cat is left dumbfounded.

unicorn

One of the few doodles to be done in color, the unicorn is vibrant, yet relaxed. Although it is pink, has flowers adorned around its ankles and neck, and has a large “YOLO” tattooed across his back, the unicorn’s half-closed eyelids and question of “sup?” indicate a chill state of being. Furthermore, the smeared black ink and splotchy use of pink – reminiscent of watercolor – illustrate a carefree mentality.

cowboy

Although the cowboy is simply depicted – quick lines, knobby hands, a lack of shading or three-dimensionality – the artist is still aware of the figure’s existence is space. The background is separated from the foreground by a horizontal line, and the shadow in front of the cowboy indicates that he is outside with the sun behind him. The wide stance, broad shoulders, and downward gaze highlight the seriousness of the cowboy, as if he is ready for confrontation.

i'm a dang fish

This doodle depicts a scene between two mythical creatures. The anthropomorphic figure on the left claims through its word bubble to be a fish; however, the figure has human-like legs and appears to be wearing pants and shoes. Although the figure has gills on both sides of its body, its also has a human nose, luscious lips, large teeth, and eyebrows. With its fins raised, the character declares “I’m A Dang Fish.” To the right of the fish is a cow, who accepts the fish’s declaration with a simple, “ok.” The cow does not question the fish’s statement- potentially because the fish is so adamant in its identity, or maybe because the cow, who has the body of a hamburger, has no right to question the label that others assign to themselves.

butt tree

The spooky, sinuous tree has tiny sets of eyes, or potentially breasts, upon its branches. Floating above the tree are what appear to be pear-shaped bottoms, as well as many smoky eyes with dainty eyelashes. The combination of feminine body parts throughout the tree create the sense that the tree is in fact a woman by gender – mother nature, if you will. However, the tree is devoid of greenery or leaves, as if it is barren, and appears eerie and haunted. Such connotations suggest a very different meaning for what it means to be female – something much darker.

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